「先住民」タグアーカイブ

“Place-based Education\” Lecture Cecilia Martz (Tacuk)1

Cecilia Martz (Tacuk)
Cup’ik Educator
Yaaveskaniryaraq Project, l999-Present

Educational View Point of Cu\’pik

Before I start my presentation I\’d like to show what I\’m wearing. This is a traditional upper outer wear that we use in Alaska. You\’ll see this being worn by women in the different villages in the rural areas. It\’s called a qaspeq. And we also wear other clothing which are specific to Alaska Natives. And my husband is also wearing a qasupeq.

My name is Cecilia. That was a name given to me by an outside person. My real name is Tacuk, from my own people. And I didn\’t know that I was Cecilia until I went to school. Like you, the indigenous peoples of Alaska, we\’re losing our culture, we are losing our language. Young adults and their children who are moving away from the villages, they are adopting Western culture, and even people in our villages, they are all adopting Western culture.

Elders that you saw in Ray\’s presentation with the vast knowledge, with the deep culture, with their deep cultural knowledge, are dying, and the ones that are alive, are being used as part of everyday educational processes in the community as we as the school, as much as they should be.

They are getting more involved in the educational process. In my home village of Chevak, in the Cup\’ik area, the State of Alaska School District hires two Elders to be in the school every single day. So some of the schools are using the Elders in their schools.

The other thing that\’s happening to us in Alaska is that many of us are loosing our sense of community. A group of us realized and became alarmed at what was happening to our people, losing our culture and language. So we had many meetings with Elders for about 2 or 3 years. And we started the Yaaveskaniryaraq Program. The word Yaaveskaniryaraq has many meanings but I\’ll give you two of them. It\’s a very very deep Yup\’ik/Cu\’pik word. One meaning is moving from one level to a higher level. Another meaning is relearning and living your culture because that\’s who you are. The posters you picked up when you came in say the same thing. We use this as the foundation for our curriculum in the Yaaveskaniryaraq Program. This was developed by those who have teaching degrees already, and were working toward their Master\’s Degrees. They developed this with the help of Elders. We tried to translate it into English but the English language wasn\’t adequate enough to really bring out what we meant.

It usually takes about 3 hours to explain the whole thing, but it takes a whole lifetime to live it. Just that word qanruyutet, if we wrote it down into books, it would fill a whole library. It covers emotional, spiritual, physical, mental, all those things, and it covers all of the intangible as well as the tangible. As an example, that paragraph includes respect for nature. We feel that everything in this world has an awareness, a spirit. A rock, a baby, a seal, a plant, sky, water, wind, everything has an awareness and spirit.

Just a very specific example: when we are walking out on the tundra, when we\’re walking on the beach, when we are walking anywhere in the wilderness, if we come across a log that is imbedded into the ground, and since we view it as having an awareness, we know that that log is tired, wet and uncomfortable. We pick it up and turn it over. And while we are turning it over, we think about something positive, for instance, for another person, something positive to happen to that person, or if we have sicknesses we think about the sicknesses while we are turning the log over. And also that log when it gets turned over will get dry and might help somebody for survival.

Another example is a seal. When we catch a seal, we don\’t waste any part of it. We use everything of the seal. We use the skin for things like clothing, for bags, for storage. And the meat, we use for our sustenance, for our food. And the bones, we never throw them in the trash. We\’re supposed to bring that to a small lake or a pond and put the bones back into nature.

「地域に根ざした教育」シシリア・マーツ(ダチュック)さん講演内容1

シシリア・マーツ(ダチュック)氏
チュピック民族教育家
アラスカ大学教育学修士。アラスカ大学アラスカ先住民研究助教授を経て、1999年から「ヤーベスカニヤラク」プロジェクト推進委員。
アラスカ先住民研究の第一線で活躍し、先住民文化、言語、精神文化、異文化教育などの分野でも貢献。
*チュピックはユピックエスキモーと同じ民族

チュピック民族の教育観

お話を聞いていただく前に私が着ている衣装を見ていただきたいと思います。集落によって違いはありますが、これはアラスカ先住民の女性が着る「カスパック」という服です。もちろんこの他に先住民族には独特の様々な衣装があるのですが、今日は持ってきておりません。私の夫マイクが着ているのも「カスパック」と呼ばれる先住民の物です。男性用です。

私の名前「シシリア」というのは先住民ではない「外」の人からつけてもらった名前で、私の本来の名前、民族の名前は「ダチュック」です。学校に行って初めて私の名前が「シシリア」だということを知りました。日本でも同じようなことがあるかもしれませんが、現代のアラスカ先住民は自分たち本来の文化をそして本来の言葉を失いつつあります。成人した若い人たちは子どもたちを連れて村から出て行ってしまう。また集落に住んでいる人たちも西洋式の生活を身につけてしまっています。

大変深い文化的な知識を持っている村の長老たちは高齢で亡くなってしまう、あるいは、まだ生きている長老たちも、本来彼らの知恵を活用すべきである、地域社会あるいは学校でそれらの知識を活かすことなく暮らしています。

私の住んでいるチュピックの地域、チバック村では2人の長老に毎日必ず学校に出向いてもらい、教育のプロセスに関与するようにしてもらいました。このようにいくつかの学校では長老の知恵を学校で活用するようになってきています。

もう一つアラスカの私たちの生活の現状として申し上げたいのは、community‐地域社会‐の感覚を多くの人たちが失いつつあることです。本来の文化、言葉が急速に失われつつあるという、このような現状を踏まえて、ここ2,3年長老たちと何回もミーティングを重ねてきました。その結果、「ヤーベスカニヤラク」というプロジェクトを立ち上げることになりました。このヤーベスカニヤラクは、いろいろな意味を含んだ先住民の言葉です。その中から2つだけご紹介したいと思います。ユピック・チュピックの言葉でいろいろな意味があるうちの一つで、一つのレベルからより高いレベルへ行くという意味です。もう一つは、文化を学ぶことによって、本来自分が何者であるかを知るという意味です。このポスターは、「ユーヤラック」と言い、これを私たちの教育のカリキュラムの基本、土台として現在新しい教育プログラムを進めています。これは、教育学で修士課程にいる人たちが村の長老の助けを得て、このように書いてまとめたものです。これを英語で翻訳しようと試みたのですが、英語ではこの言葉が持つ本来の意味が十分に表現できないということが分かりました。この内容を説明すると3時間ぐらいかかり、また、ここに書かれている教えを実践するには一生かかるものです。

例えば、「qanruyutet」という言葉がありますが、この言葉だけでも、その意味するところを文字にしたら、図書館いっぱいになってしまう膨大な知識の量となります。情緒的なもの、精神的なもの、物理的なもの、またメンタル、精神的なもの、それら全てかつ、手に触ることができるものできないもの、全てが含まれます。今日はここに書かれている全ての教えを時間の関係で正しく説明できないので、いくつか具体的な例を挙げながら、ご理解いただきたいと思います。第三段落目のところですが、自然を大切にするという内容が書かれています。すなわち、ここで言っているのは、世の中全てのものには意識がある、魂があるということです。例えば、赤ちゃんでも、あるいは、アザラシでも、海でも、風でも、全てのものに意識がある、魂があるということです。

もう少し具体的な例をあげると、私たちが山や海辺、荒野を歩いて行ったときに、道に土に半分埋もれているような丸太が転がっていたとしましょう。その丸太を見て、私たちはそのような木にも意識があるのだと考えます。そして、その木は意識があるのだから疲れているだろう、すっかり湿ってしまって居心地が悪いだろうと考えてその木をひっくり返してあげるのです。このように転がっている木をひっくり返すという行為には、何か良い事がつながるようにという願いが込められています。それをすることで、この木が別の誰かの役に立つのではないか、と、ちょうど誰か病気の場合に病気が良くなるようにと願うような同じ気持ちになるのです。そのように転がって埋もれた木も、ひっくり返すことによって乾いてくる。そうすると、生存の為にその木を必要としている人に役立つかもしれません。

もう一つ、アザラシの例です。アザラシは皆さん良くご存知かと思います。先住民はアザラシを獲りますが、決して無駄にしないで、すっかり使い切るようにしています。アザラシの皮で着るものを作ることができます。バックを作ったり、あるいは、保管貯蔵するための袋を皮で作ることができます。肉は生きていくため、生存のため全て食べます。そして骨も、ゴミとして捨てることはしません。骨を捨ててはいけないと教えられています。アザラシの骨は全て池に持って行き、池に入れる。自然に還すのです。

一段落目の「Ilakulluta」という言葉は、いくつかの意味を持っています。その一つは、長老を大切にしなさいという意味です。私たちの文化では長老のために食事を作ってあげたり、家を掃除してあげたり、どこかに行く時には連れて行ってあげたりというように、長老を大切にします。私たちの文化の教えとして、長老というのは大変な知恵を持っている、長老を助けることで、彼らの知恵に助けられ、助けた人がその人生で成功ができると教えられているからです。

またこの言葉は、自然をうやまうということも示しています。自然に関しては自分たちの住んでいる環境を知ること、自分たちが住んでいる地域の動物を知ることが大切です。例えば動物の中でも、鳥たちに関する物語を子どもの頃から聞かされて私たちは学んでいきますが、すべてを語るのに5日間かかります。長い長い物語なので、さわりだけをご紹介します。この物語は、地域で一番小さな鳥が主人公です。この小さな鳥が伴侶を失ってしまい、別の伴侶を選ぶことになりました。そしたら、全ての他の鳥たちがこの鳥のもとにやって来た。非常に大きな鳥から非常に小さな鳥まで様々な鳥が訪ねて来た。この物語を聞きながら、私たちは全ての鳥の鳴き声や色、そしてその名前を覚えるのです。なぜこんなに長い物語になるかと言うと、私たちが住んでいる地域にはたくさんの鳥がいるからです。

レイ・バーンハートさんの略歴

レイ・バーンハート氏
(アラスカ大学フェアバンクスキャンパス多文化スタディ教授)

1970年から、先住民教育の調査、研究に従事。多文化教育部長を務めた他、小規模高校プロジェクト、多文化研究センター、多地域間教育プログラム、アラスカ先住民知識ネットワークの立ち上げに関わる。研究対象は、先住民の知識体系、先住民教育のための教師養成、僻地教育、小規模学校カリキュラム、僻地文化と多文化への組織的適応。アラスカ以外でも、ボルチモア、メリーランドでの教師経験がある他、カナダ、アイスランド、インド、マラウィ、ニュージーランドでの研究経験がある。
1999年2月、北海道教育大学の招へい来日。北海道教育大学とアラスカ大学で幾つかの共同研究プロジェクトや学生の交換留学制度を立ち上げる。そのつながりで、現在、アラスカ先住民とアイヌの教育についての比較研究を行う修士課程の日本人学生を指導している。